Python Tutorial
Python - Introduction Python - Syntax Python - Variable Python - Number Python - Casting Python - String Python - Operators Python - Conditions Python - Loops Python - List Python - Tuple Python - Set Python - Dictionary Python - Function Python - Module Python - Date & Time Python - Input Output Python - Error & Exception Python - File Handling
Python OOP
OOP - Introduction OOP - Class Members OOP - Constructor Destructor OOP - Data Hiding OOP - Inheritance OOP - Overriding OOP - Overloading

Python Conditions

Conditional statements are used to perform logical selection of a block of code. Selection depends of given condition/test/expression.

Python supports the usual logical conditions from mathematics:

  • Equals: a == b
  • Not Equals: a != b
  • Less than: a < b
  • Less than or equal to: a <= b
  • Greater than: a > b
  • Greater than or equal to: a >= b

These conditions can be used in several ways, most commonly in "if statements".

An "if statement" is written by using the if keyword.

The following code shows how to check whether a list contains some item:


The else statement

An else statement can be combined with an if statement. An else statement contains the block of code that executes if the conditional expression in the if statement resolves to 0 or a FALSE value.

The else statement is an optional statement and there could be at most only one else statement following if.


The elif statement

The elif statement allows you to check multiple expressions for TRUE and execute a block of code as soon as one of the conditions evaluates to TRUE.

Similar to the else, the elif statement is optional. However, unlike else, for which there can be at most one statement, there can be an arbitrary number of elif statements following an if.


Nested if...else Statement

You can nest (one condition inside another condition) if...else statement: